Helping cats and dogs live their healthiest lives.
Sacred Birman kitten stood next to an adult Yorskhire Terrier in black and white.

Dental care for dogs

Protect the only set of teeth your dog will ever have with advanced kibbles designed to help keep his teeth and gums healthy.

Royal Canin Dental Care line of Dog Food

Up to 55% less tartar formation

Some dogs are more prone to the accumulation of dental tartar. After eating, food residuals form a thin layer of plaque covering the teeth. Over time, plaque calcifies into tartar, which accelerates the accumulation of bacteria that can have health consequences.

Our Dental Care dry dog food has been scientifically proven to reduce the formation of tartar on dogs’ teeth by up to 55% (MEDIUM formula), up to 46% (LARGE formula), or up to 29% (SMALL formula).*

*Royal Canin internal study, 2018.

Yorkshire Terrier Dog Standing Up

The nutrition of dental care

Your dog can develop plaque and tartar as bacteria and debris naturally settle on his teeth. Our kibbles have an advanced texture that helps clean your dog's teeth while he chews. They surround each tooth as your dog bites down, so every mouthful rubs the surface with a brushing effect.

Dental Care tips

Along with Dental Care nutrition, a few hints and tips to help keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy.

Vet visits

It’s important to take your dog for routine vet visits. Your dog may need a teeth cleaning. During the visit, the veterinarian performs an oral exam and will recommend a dental cleaning when appropriate.

West Highland White Terrier lying down on an examination table being examined by a vet.

Tooth brushing

It’s a good idea to brush your dog’s teeth daily yourself, as well as taking him to the vet. Make sure you use toothpaste for dogs and a suitably sized soft toothbrush. And, ideally, start doing this when he is a puppy to help him get used to it.

Maltese adult having teeth checked by owner

Oral checks

When you’re cleaning your dog’s teeth or playing with him, you may notice that some areas of his gums are redder than others. This means you’ve caught gum disease in action, and it’s your cue to visit the vet for an extra check.

German Shorthaired Pointer adult having a dental examination at the vets.